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Trans Israel with Joe Schwartz

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Our little peloton cruises along, covering ground at a smooth and efficient pace. Two days into the ride, and our band of strangers has meshed together on the road, pacing effectively and working as a team. The strange rewards of suffering out the kilometres on the bike are beginning to show, and everyone is feeling the flow. It’s just like every other memorable group ride, except for the F16s screaming overhead reminding us that we’re riding through one of the more contentious pieces of land on Earth.

The Trans Israel is a four-day ride starting in Rosh Hanrika, the far northwest corner of the country, and ending 562 kilometres later on the shores of the Red Sea, in the resort town of Eilat. It’s a ride dreamed up by Harel Nahmani, an Israeli rider and event organizer responsible for a number of Gran Fondos in the north and south of the country, and group rides in the Alps every year.  Harel is excited to send us off on Day 1 in Rosh Hanrika, but maintains a serious air as he goes over some of the dangers of the ride with our group. Most of his worry lies with things like road etiquette and conditions, and peloton riding with a mixed group of riders, concerns similar to most cycling events anywhere in the world. Judging by the heavily armed UN soldiers loitering near our group, and the closed (and thickly razor wired) border to Lebanon a stones throw away from our start area, some concerns lie in the chosen route for the ride, and it’s already been determined that we’ll jump in a bus and shuttle through the most touchy area in the Jordan River Valley.

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Any other concerns melt away as we hit the road, quickly turning off the busier thoroughfares into the first climb of the trip, an 800 metre ascent into a forested nature reserve running along the border of Lebanon. The stiff climb spreads the group apart, and I take in the scenery, pumping up the steep grade, trees casting a much-needed shade onto the road. It’s slightly warmer here than the damp, cold October weather I left in my home of Squamish, BC, and my body is having a hard time adjusting to the heat. Later on in the day we’re rewarded with a cooling wind from our high-speed descent towards the Sea of Galilee.  A low afternoon sun bathes the cliffs above the Sea in a golden light, and it’s hard not to ponder stories of the many miracles Jesus was said to have performed right here on these shores. While we’re not walking on water, the smooth road and organized pace line has us feel like we’re flying as we wind down the day’s ride and head to the Kibbutz Ashdot Yaakov, our lodgings for the night.

The kibbutz experience is unique to traveling in Israel.  Established in the early 1900’s there are over 200 kibbutzim all across Israel. Initially formed as communal settlements focused on agriculture and an egalitarian way of life, the kibbutz has evolved with the times, and while still maintaining a farming focus, they’ve branched out into more modern sources of revenue. Kibbutz Ashdot Yaacov, where we’re staying tonight, generates most of its income from a plastics plant, and supplements that with quaint country lodge rentals, some of which our group are occupying for the night. Kibbutz meals consist of hearty communal buffets of delicious local fare, perfect after a day toiling in the fields or riding long distance on a road bike.

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Over the next two days I sink into the perfect rhythm of the road. Our group has meshed together well and the kilometres tick by as desert vistas expand in front us. Two distinct groups have formed; one keener on hammering than the other.  Our group is as diverse as the country we’re riding through.  Some have lived on kibbutzim for 30 years and more. There’s a group of Americans, riding for the Jewish Agency for Israel. My cousin JJ, who’s lived in Tel Aviv for the last decade, is on the ride. In fact, JJ is the reason I’m here, this whole trip stemming from a casual invite from him a year ago at a Montreal wedding. JJ and I ride in the front group with visitors from England and Belgium, expats working and living all around Israel, and Israeli riders too. Udi, from near Tel Aviv, perpetually looks like he’s out for a casual spin, because he probably is; his normal ride schedule including training sessions with Peter Sagan’s Israeli Pro Continental team, the only pro team in the country. The trailing group is made up of folks out for a more casual pace, and some more senior riders that offer some great inspiration to some of us “younger” bucks out on the ride.

There are a few opportunities to get off the saddle and appreciate our surroundings, even if that means stopping on the side of the highway to check out the camels that sometimes appear as if out of nowhere, camouflaged by their arid surroundings. I spend an evening floating in the Dead Sea, which, at 418m below sea level, is the lowest place on earth. The intensely salty water creates ”a cork in a bathtub” buoyancy I was not fully prepared for, and is a stinging reminder of any small nick or cut I currently possess. We visit Masada, a mountaintop fortress built by Herod, King of Judea, over 2000 years ago. Masada marks the middle of our ride on Day 3, and bikes in hand we take the cable car up onto the high plateau to look around. We descend (on foot) off the western side, down the Roman siege ramp used to penetrate the fortress where hundreds of Jewish freedom fighters were encamped, 960 rebels who killed themselves rather than be taken by the Romans. Thousands of years of history whirling around in my thoughts, we get back on the bikes below, and carry on with our ride.

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Our last day dawns early, starting on the cliff-side town of Mitzpe Ramon. We’re all re-energized from a delicious dinner and restful sleep at the Hotel Ibex, the nicest accommodations of the trip. We pedal out of town as the sun barely crests the far rim of the Ramon Crater, the large erosion-formed basin the town sits precariously on the edge of. The cold wind of the descent to the crater floor works better than any second cup of coffee, and as the rising sun warms the desert, the pace picks up and we pedal towards the Red Sea. The last three days of riding are beginning to take their toll on my legs. With the end of the ride nearing, and after three days of keeping the leash tight on us, our gruff ride leader Nitzan relinquishes control on our lead group. Like horses to the barn, the pace picks up and we lean into the final 40 kilometres. This last stretch of road feels oppressive. The sun, now at it’s apex, beats down on the barren Negev desert. The route is rolling, the dips offering brief respites from the heat, but quickly turning to steady ascents that seem to go on much longer than they should. I find myself in a breakaway pack of four, and hold their wheels for a good distance until my legs give up on me, and all of a sudden I’m by myself. This road travels south down the Sinai Peninsula, and along the Egyptian border. I ride in silence next to an imposing 6 metre tall wall of razor wire marking the boundary line, guard outposts sporadically breaking the chaotic patterns formed by the fence.

The final crest eventually appears, and the long descent into the resort city of Eilat begins. Eilat is the southernmost outpost in the country, and also marks the end of the Trans Israel. Leaving the razor wire fences behind, I tuck towards the Red Sea, its water shimmering below. It’s been a different ride experience than I’m used to. Most of my adventures don’t involve F16s, razor wire, and “Tank Crossing” signs on the highway. While jarring to my North American senses, these things don’t define this trip, just as much as they don’t define Israel. This trip has been about new vistas, new friends and new experiences. These are standards to which every great bike ride is measured, and this Trans Israel experience has delivered them all.

Read more from: Blogs,On The Road

Beans and Rice Freeride: Ep. 1 “Too Deep, Too Steep”

SCARPA athlete Jake Sakson and his buddy Morgan Boyles are back at it with their own brand of deep and quirky telemark action. Relocating to Central Colorado opens the crew up to the ski mountaineering potential of the Colorado Rockies and has them seriously considering the true place of Freeheel skiing. Beans and Rice: Episode […]

The post Beans and Rice Freeride: Ep. 1 “Too Deep, Too Steep” appeared first on SCARPA North America.

Read more from: Athletes,Blogs,On The Road

Ski Touring the Indian Himalayas

I’m often asked, where is your absolute favorite place to ski in the world. Valdez? France? Argentina? Greenland? British Columbia? Switzerland? Chile? Antarctica? Emphatically, my response is always INDIA. The response to my response? “Are there mountains there?” Just the world’s greatest and highest peaks – the Himalayas.

I’ve skied these giant peaks from many angles and in many different countries -Bhutan, Nepal, Pakistan, and multiple parts of India. Every expedition blew my mind, challenged my mountaineering skills, and expanded my cultural knowledge. Bhutan’s lack of tourism, intact traditional values, intact ecosystems, and commitment to “Gross-National-Happiness” left me wanting to return again and again. Pakistan’s views of K2 while shredding powder be etched in my heart forever.

So why is India my #1, and in particular the Manali Himachel Pradesh region? Not only was the skiing, touring, and mountaineering beyond perfect, but I really was drawn to the various peoples, cultures, and foods. So often in my ski travels, the skiing was phenomenal, but the rest totally sucked – bed-bug ridden hotel rooms, crappy weather, and greasy fast food.

India redefined that notion. Not only was the weather often bluebird like Colorado, I could ski the raddest line of my life in Intercontinental snowpack, and then be in the midst a festival, donnning costumes, throwing colored dyes, and eating would impress even Gordon Ramsey. And all on an incredibly inexpensive budget, while living quite large.

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The vast amount of peaks to scale and explore never got old. And almost daily we would end up in a town that had never seen white people, let alone skiers. There are zillions of one-two-three day adventures, or longer expeditions, such as our first descent of the NW face of 20,000-foot Hanuman Tibba, shown below:

hanuman color

After several days hiking up the other side, this is what the chute looked like on the way down, and more than 10,000 vertical:

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Even with the best packs in the world (Osprey of course!), carrying this much crap up is epic, let alone skiing down. Ten turns at 17,000 feet, leaves me gasping every time.

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Shorter excursions with lighter Osprey Packs was never any less adventurous, and almost always ended in great turns, followed by hiking out in lower elevations until reaching villages on the valley floors. Always followed by the best cup of chai known to mankind, no matter how remote.

A silhouette of a woman hiker on the Biafo glacier in the Karakoram Himalaya in Pakistan

A silhouette of a woman hiker on the Biafo glacier in the Karakoram Himalaya in Pakistan

Ready to go yet? Some resources: Guide Book – Ski Touring in India’s Kullu Valley by CR Spooner is a must have, and not available over there. If you are wanting some assistance rather than organizing it yourself, Ski Tour the Himalayas with Himalayan Extreme Center

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And don’t forget your favorite Osprey Packs, such as my favorites The Kode 42, The Variant 52, or the Viva 65

Read more from: Blogs,On The Road

#TakeMeYonder Contest: Winner, Winner, Chicken Dinner + A Ton of Great Gear!

TakeMeYonder_Contest_OspreyPacks

Thank you to everyone who entered our #TakeMeYonder photo contest! For this giveaway, we asked you to submit your most memorable photo moments from 2015 and we ended up with thousands of beautiful entries to choose from — it wasn’t easy to select three winners from so many great photographs!

Here are the 1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners, each of whom will each receive gear for their 2016 adventures from top Colorado brands such as Osprey Packs, Zeal Optics, New Belgium Brewing, Big Agnes, Voormi, Scarpa, Yonder App as well as two tickets to one of Yonder Mountain String Band’s “4 Nights of New Year” shows at the Boulder Theater,  December 30th – January 2nd. Below are the winning moments of 2015 and the stories behind each unique photograph.

To see the gallery of all the amazing #TakeMeYonder photo submissions, visit: www.ospreypacks.com/takemeyonder


1st Place: Dylan Thompson | Yosemite Valley

“When 2015 started we decided that we would take a summer trip to Sequoia National Park and Yosemite National Park at the end of May. We had an amazing time in Sequoia and we headed straight to Yosemite. We woke up at 3AM to drive to Yosemite and waited in line for 4 hours to get wilderness and Half Dome permits.

On May 28th, we stopped briefly in Little Yosemite Valley to drop off gear and hiked up to Half Dome. Through the switchbacks, blisters, and moments of ‘whose crazy idea was this again?’ we worked through it together. We saw a few people taking pictures on the same ledge and we thought there was no way in hell that either of us wanted to go out onto it. I told my girlfriend (now fiancé), to stand on the ledge so I could set up the camera. I asked a few random guys from Finland to take ‘a lot of pictures’ but didn’t tell them my plan.

I asked her, ‘So, will you?’ and she said, ‘You haven’t asked me yet!’ While I might have originally forgot to ask the most important question, I did ask her something equally important. I said, ‘I couldn’t imagine backpacking and traveling with anyone else besides you. Will you be my adventure and backpacking partner for the rest of our lives?’ In the end she did say YES to both questions.

This was our first backpacking trip together, but definitely not the last. Coincidentally enough, both of our packs this day were Osprey. In a way, we can thank Osprey Packs for contributing to our special moment. Thank you!”

 

TakeMeYonder_Winner_Dylan-Thompson

2nd Place: Michael Morton | The Wave, Utah

“Our hike to The Wave was an easy choice as my outdoor highlight of 2015.  First, I admired this special spot on the map for years and could only hope that one day I would find myself within its open spaces. Second, it had taken almost two years to get lucky enough to win the online permit lottery with the Bureau of Land Management. Third, once we cleared that hurdle, we had to patiently plan and wait three months for our particular day on the calendar.  There was much more waiting, than planning. You don’t really have to plan, you simply show up and experience it!

As soon as you turn off of Highway 89 and head over eight miles south along the dirt road to the trailhead, you realize you’re somewhere special.  This is a land of solitude.  A land deceivingly alive with slow drifting clouds, Edward Abbey, Vermilion Cliffs, slot canyons, dinosaur tracks, hieroglyphs, jackrabbits, coyotes, desert bighorn sheep, roadrunners, northern harriers and too many other smaller inhabitants to name.  In fact, even getting to the trail-head involves fortune being on your side as just enough rain can make the road impassible and could potentially wipe out all of one’s plans!

The Wave finds itself a few miles out on an unmarked path along slick rock and sand dunes located within Coyote Buttes North.  200 million years ago this area was a vast desert containing oasis like watering holes that provided life to dinosaurs among other things.  About 15 million years ago the forces of nature that formed the Navajo Sandstone that you see today began to take shape.  Geological and scientific words like erosion, sedimentary, cross-bedded, laminae, grain-flow, wind-ripple and many others tell the story of what happened here.  Phantasmagoric is how I would describe it. Somewhere along the way as you hike south, you leave Utah and enter Arizona.  It’s a significant line on the map, but it’s irrelevant when you are there. As you walk the approximate three miles towards The Wave, you come to the realization that you are encountering the same natural forces working today that sculpted this place over millions of years.

This is a living landscape beyond description.  The anticipation builds as you approach the area.  The landscape slowly morphs from sand dunes to slick rock to sandstone lines and patterns of red, orange, pink, yellow and whatever other colors you might or might not notice.  Then you realize you have hours to explore The Wave itself. You ask, what is the hurry? I admit that I did not ask that myself but was prompted towards the question with the actions of one of my hiking companions. You start to explore the area and around every hidden corner and wall you find an oasis, green plants, herds of sheep, something or anything that you never expected to find.  Finally, you arrive.  When we arrived we were in awe.  How many times in your life have you planned and dreamed of something and when the moment appeared, you were underwhelmed?  That will not happen to you here and it did not happen to us on November 9th, 2015.  In fact it was probably one of the most specific instances in my entire life when despite the high level of anticipation, my expectations were exceeded beyond words. I can’t think of many other experiences in my life, much less the past year when I felt so alive and in the moment. One moment within 200 million years! It was if I had been right there all along.

The patterns, The Wave, the silence, the sky, the building clouds, the shadows, the setting sun.  It is an experience I will never forget.”

TakeMeYonder_2nd_Place_Winner_Michael_Morton_Osprey_Packs

3rd Place: Ryan Williams | Cincinnati, Ohio

“A warm July 4th in Cincinnati set the scene for a perfect night!  After spending time in the amusement park and watching fireworks, our family went to see Yonder Mountain String Band at a small outdoor venue.  We had set up further back and had enjoyed the first set listening to the band, playing with glow sticks and meeting other families in the same general area.

During set break my youngest son, who was six at the time, mentioned he kind of wanted to go up front and check it out!  He didn’t have to ask me twice, we jumped up and headed up front!  Before we knew it he was at the rail, standing there in awe of the band! It occurred to me that while he has been exposed to music his entire life, he may never have been that close to the music as it was being made on this scale! I stood there in awe with him, I was in awe of the entire moment. There was one of the loves of my life enjoying one of my favorite pastimes with me. He really seemed to understand that night, that music holds a power to make you feel things.  That night we both felt amazed!

Spending that time with my son while we listened to the band together was truly a highlight of my 2015 and nothing I’ll soon forget.”

TakeMeYonder_3rd-Place_RyanWilliams_Osprey_Packs


The #TakeMeYonder Prizes: 

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1st Place Prize:

Two tickets to one of the four nights of Yonder Mountain String Band’s performances at the Boulder Theater, December 30th – January 2nd. Also, an exclusive “Meet & Greet” BBQ with the band prior to the shows. (Value $84)

(2) Osprey Packs New 2016 Volt / Viva (65/60L) backpack (Value $360)

(1) Pair of Scarpa Crux Shoes (Value $115)

(1) Pair of Zeal Optics Essentials Sunglasses (Value $99)

(1) New Belgium Growler (Value $52)

(1) Voormi Drift Jacket (Value $249)

(1) Big Agnes Tumble Mountain Glo 2 person + (4) MtnGLO Tent Light Accessories (Value $410)

2nd Place Prize: 

Two tickets to one of the four nights of Yonder Mountain String Band’s performances at the Boulder Theater, December 30th – January 2nd. Also, an exclusive “Meet & Greet” BBQ with the band prior to the shows. (Value $84)

(1) Osprey Packs New 2016 Volt / Viva (65/60L) backpack (Value $180)

(1) Pair of Scarpa Crux Shoes (Value $115)

(1) Pair of Zeal Optics Essentials Sunglasses (Value $99)

(1) Voormi Drift Jacket (Value $249)

(1) New Belgium Growler (Value $52)

(2) Big Agnes Hats (Value $30)

(2) Yonder App T-shirts (Value $40)

3rd Place Prize: 

Two tickets to one of the four nights of Yonder Mountain String Band’s performances at the Boulder Theater, December 30th – January 2nd. Also, an exclusive “Meet & Greet” BBQ with the band prior to the shows. (Value $84)

(2) Big Agnes Hats (Value $30)

(2) Osprey Packs Sweaters (Value $70)

(2) Yonder App T-shirts (Value $40)

(1) Signed CD from Yonder Mountain String Band (Value $25)

TakeMeYonder_Volt_Viva_Osprey_Packs

Read more from: Blogs,On The Road

#TakeMeYonder Contest: Winner, Winner, Chicken Dinner + A Ton of Great Gear!

TakeMeYonder_Contest_OspreyPacks

Thank you to everyone who entered our #TakeMeYonder photo contest! For this giveaway, we asked you to submit your most memorable photo moments from 2015 and we ended up with thousands of beautiful entries to choose from — it wasn’t easy to select three winners from so many great photographs!

Here are the 1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners, each of whom will each receive gear for their 2016 adventures from top Colorado brands such as Osprey Packs, Zeal Optics, New Belgium Brewing, Big Agnes, Voormi, Scarpa, Yonder App as well as two tickets to one of Yonder Mountain String Band’s “4 Nights of New Year” shows at the Boulder Theater,  December 30th – January 2nd. Below are the winning moments of 2015 and the stories behind each unique photograph.

To see the gallery of all the amazing #TakeMeYonder photo submissions, visit: www.ospreypacks.com/takemeyonder


1st Place: Dylan Thompson | Yosemite Valley

“When 2015 started we decided that we would take a summer trip to Sequoia National Park and Yosemite National Park at the end of May. We had an amazing time in Sequoia and we headed straight to Yosemite. We woke up at 3AM to drive to Yosemite and waited in line for 4 hours to get wilderness and Half Dome permits.

On May 28th, we stopped briefly in Little Yosemite Valley to drop off gear and hiked up to Half Dome. Through the switchbacks, blisters, and moments of ‘whose crazy idea was this again?’ we worked through it together. We saw a few people taking pictures on the same ledge and we thought there was no way in hell that either of us wanted to go out onto it. I told my girlfriend (now fiancé), to stand on the ledge so I could set up the camera. I asked a few random guys from Finland to take ‘a lot of pictures’ but didn’t tell them my plan.

I asked her, ‘So, will you?’ and she said, ‘You haven’t asked me yet!’ While I might have originally forgot to ask the most important question, I did ask her something equally important. I said, ‘I couldn’t imagine backpacking and traveling with anyone else besides you. Will you be my adventure and backpacking partner for the rest of our lives?’ In the end she did say YES to both questions.

This was our first backpacking trip together, but definitely not the last. Coincidentally enough, both of our packs this day were Osprey. In a way, we can thank Osprey Packs for contributing to our special moment. Thank you!”

 

TakeMeYonder_Winner_Dylan-Thompson

2nd Place: Michael Morton | The Wave, Utah

“Our hike to The Wave was an easy choice as my outdoor highlight of 2015.  First, I admired this special spot on the map for years and could only hope that one day I would find myself within its open spaces. Second, it had taken almost two years to get lucky enough to win the online permit lottery with the Bureau of Land Management. Third, once we cleared that hurdle, we had to patiently plan and wait three months for our particular day on the calendar.  There was much more waiting, than planning. You don’t really have to plan, you simply show up and experience it!

As soon as you turn off of Highway 89 and head over eight miles south along the dirt road to the trailhead, you realize you’re somewhere special.  This is a land of solitude.  A land deceivingly alive with slow drifting clouds, Edward Abbey, Vermilion Cliffs, slot canyons, dinosaur tracks, hieroglyphs, jackrabbits, coyotes, desert bighorn sheep, roadrunners, northern harriers and too many other smaller inhabitants to name.  In fact, even getting to the trail-head involves fortune being on your side as just enough rain can make the road impassible and could potentially wipe out all of one’s plans!

The Wave finds itself a few miles out on an unmarked path along slick rock and sand dunes located within Coyote Buttes North.  200 million years ago this area was a vast desert containing oasis like watering holes that provided life to dinosaurs among other things.  About 15 million years ago the forces of nature that formed the Navajo Sandstone that you see today began to take shape.  Geological and scientific words like erosion, sedimentary, cross-bedded, laminae, grain-flow, wind-ripple and many others tell the story of what happened here.  Phantasmagoric is how I would describe it. Somewhere along the way as you hike south, you leave Utah and enter Arizona.  It’s a significant line on the map, but it’s irrelevant when you are there. As you walk the approximate three miles towards The Wave, you come to the realization that you are encountering the same natural forces working today that sculpted this place over millions of years.

This is a living landscape beyond description.  The anticipation builds as you approach the area.  The landscape slowly morphs from sand dunes to slick rock to sandstone lines and patterns of red, orange, pink, yellow and whatever other colors you might or might not notice.  Then you realize you have hours to explore The Wave itself. You ask, what is the hurry? I admit that I did not ask that myself but was prompted towards the question with the actions of one of my hiking companions. You start to explore the area and around every hidden corner and wall you find an oasis, green plants, herds of sheep, something or anything that you never expected to find.  Finally, you arrive.  When we arrived we were in awe.  How many times in your life have you planned and dreamed of something and when the moment appeared, you were underwhelmed?  That will not happen to you here and it did not happen to us on November 9th, 2015.  In fact it was probably one of the most specific instances in my entire life when despite the high level of anticipation, my expectations were exceeded beyond words. I can’t think of many other experiences in my life, much less the past year when I felt so alive and in the moment. One moment within 200 million years! It was if I had been right there all along.

The patterns, The Wave, the silence, the sky, the building clouds, the shadows, the setting sun.  It is an experience I will never forget.”

TakeMeYonder_2nd_Place_Winner_Michael_Morton_Osprey_Packs

3rd Place: Ryan Williams | Cincinnati, Ohio

“A warm July 4th in Cincinnati set the scene for a perfect night!  After spending time in the amusement park and watching fireworks, our family went to see Yonder Mountain String Band at a small outdoor venue.  We had set up further back and had enjoyed the first set listening to the band, playing with glow sticks and meeting other families in the same general area.

During set break my youngest son, who was six at the time, mentioned he kind of wanted to go up front and check it out!  He didn’t have to ask me twice, we jumped up and headed up front!  Before we knew it he was at the rail, standing there in awe of the band! It occurred to me that while he has been exposed to music his entire life, he may never have been that close to the music as it was being made on this scale! I stood there in awe with him, I was in awe of the entire moment. There was one of the loves of my life enjoying one of my favorite pastimes with me. He really seemed to understand that night, that music holds a power to make you feel things.  That night we both felt amazed!

Spending that time with my son while we listened to the band together was truly a highlight of my 2015 and nothing I’ll soon forget.”

TakeMeYonder_3rd-Place_RyanWilliams_Osprey_Packs


The #TakeMeYonder Prizes: 

original_Untitled_design__1_

1st Place Prize:

Two tickets to one of the four nights of Yonder Mountain String Band’s performances at the Boulder Theater, December 30th – January 2nd. Also, an exclusive “Meet & Greet” BBQ with the band prior to the shows. (Value $84)

(2) Osprey Packs New 2016 Volt / Viva (65/60L) backpack (Value $360)

(1) Pair of Scarpa Crux Shoes (Value $115)

(1) Pair of Zeal Optics Essentials Sunglasses (Value $99)

(1) New Belgium Growler (Value $52)

(1) Voormi Drift Jacket (Value $249)

(1) Big Agnes Tumble Mountain Glo 2 person + (4) MtnGLO Tent Light Accessories (Value $410)

2nd Place Prize: 

Two tickets to one of the four nights of Yonder Mountain String Band’s performances at the Boulder Theater, December 30th – January 2nd. Also, an exclusive “Meet & Greet” BBQ with the band prior to the shows. (Value $84)

(1) Osprey Packs New 2016 Volt / Viva (65/60L) backpack (Value $180)

(1) Pair of Scarpa Crux Shoes (Value $115)

(1) Pair of Zeal Optics Essentials Sunglasses (Value $99)

(1) Voormi Drift Jacket (Value $249)

(1) New Belgium Growler (Value $52)

(2) Big Agnes Hats (Value $30)

(2) Yonder App T-shirts (Value $40)

3rd Place Prize: 

Two tickets to one of the four nights of Yonder Mountain String Band’s performances at the Boulder Theater, December 30th – January 2nd. Also, an exclusive “Meet & Greet” BBQ with the band prior to the shows. (Value $84)

(2) Big Agnes Hats (Value $30)

(2) Osprey Packs Sweaters (Value $70)

(2) Yonder App T-shirts (Value $40)

(1) Signed CD from Yonder Mountain String Band (Value $25)

TakeMeYonder_Volt_Viva_Osprey_Packs

Read more from: Blogs,On The Road