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Ames Adventure Outfitters is a Manufacturers' Representative for top quality indoor & outdoor clothing and equipment, water proofing supplies, packs, tents, solar and monitoring devices, trail running, approach, and mountaineering shoes/boots, socks, and other accessories. The manufacturing firms that we represent consistently offer merchandise that leads the industry in new technology and are regularly awarded accordingly. It is our belief that outstanding customer service and integrity in all business transactions are essential for long term success in this industry. Spend some time at the site getting to know us and our product lines.  We look forward to working with you!


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Public Lands: Valuable to Our Bottom Line and Way of Life

Dolores, CO

Boggy Draw Trail, Dolores, Colorado. photo via Osprey Packs

 

Public Lands: Valuable to Our Bottom Line and Way of Life,” written by Osprey Packs co-founder & co-owner Diane Wren, originally appeared in the Montrose Press.

 

Twenty five years ago, my husband Mike and I moved from the coastal redwoods of California to the edge of sandstone canyon country in the San Juan Mountains in the hopes of building a headquarters for our homegrown company – Osprey Packs – that would allow us to test our handmade gear in the most inspiring and rugged of places. After settling in Cortez, Osprey quickly became an international force in the outdoor industry, and we’ve been proud to grow our classic American dream in southwestern Colorado. We now employ over 80 people in Cortez and are still growing. Like many other international outdoor businesses across Colorado, we chose to build a business here because access to public lands makes this the perfect spot for our employees to settle down, for us to try out our next idea in the field, and because so many in our community share our love for getting outside and exploring our wild West.

 

The same incredible landscapes that drew us to Colorado, though, are now facing a serious threat. Out-of-state special interests like the American Lands Council are pushing legislators across the Rockies to try to seize our national public lands and transfer them into state control, which could bankrupt our states and lead to massive access closures. Colorado is lucky enough to have 24 million acres of federal public lands within our borders, but the state managing them would cost Coloradans over $300 million a year, and a single wildfire could add tens of millions of dollars to the bill. Our state is constitutionally bound to balance its budget – this additional financial burden would likely force the state to prioritize extractive uses or sell off our lands to the highest bidder for private development.

 

colorado_osprey_40_years_in_the_making

SW Colorado Lightning. image via Rory Pfotenhauer/”Osprey Packs: 40 Years in the Making”

 

Getting locked out of our land would not only be bad for Coloradans, it would threaten businesses like ours that rely on the public’s ability to enjoy outdoor activities like hiking, mountain biking, climbing, and skiing for our livelihood. Outdoor recreation contributes $13 billion to Colorado’s economy annually and supports over 122,000 jobs statewide. Undercutting our industry would be a big blow to the state and especially small towns like ours which serve as gateways to the great outdoors. Osprey, for example, is hoping to hire 14 more employees in Cortez this year – having to “pay to play” or being excluded entirely from places like the San Juan Mountains, Canyon of the Ancients, and our renowned local mountain biking haven, Phil’s World, would make attracting good talent much more difficult.

 

Phil's World

Phil’s World MTB Trail, Cortez, Colorado. photo via Osprey Packs

 

We, along with millions of other Coloradans, have built businesses and homes here distinctly because of our access to these wild places. Losing them would be a huge blow to our bottom lines and way of life. On top of that, we have a responsibility to preserve and protect places like the Uncompahgre National Forest, Dolores River Canyon, and Chimney Rock for future generations to enjoy and explore. Over 70 percent of voters in Colorado think our national public lands should remain open for the enjoyment of all Americans, and we agree – our land is part of our shared outdoor heritage, and part of what makes this country so great. Simply put, these land grabs are bad for our families, and bad for business. On behalf of Osprey and all of our employees, we urge our elected officials to address these efforts to transfer or sell off our public lands with loud and swift opposition.

 

Dolores River Canyon - photo via San Juan Citizens Alliance/ The Conservation Alliance

Dolores River Canyon.  photo via San Juan Citizens Alliance/ The Conservation Alliance

Uncompahgre management area. photo via Western Colorado Congress/The Conservation Alliance

Uncompahgre management area. photo via Western Colorado Congress/The Conservation Alliance

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Read more from: Blogs,On The Road

SCARPA’s First Friday Film Fest: April

Spring is here! Celebrate making it to Friday by watching some inspiring videos from some of our athletes on rock, snow and raging rivers. Will Gadd’s Historic Climb Up Frozen Niagara Falls Will Gadd takes ice climbing to new heights by being the first person ever to ascend the frozen sections of the world’s largest flowing waterfall, Niagara […]

Read more from: Athletes,Blogs,On The Road

Dancing on ice in our northern neighbors’ back yard

Another fantastic trip to Canada with Dave Rone for SPRING BREAK 2015!!!!!  We landed in Calgary late Friday night, departed the 2nd Sunday after for 8 possible climbing days.
We managed some excellent climbing, one link up of two large ice routes and a bit of rock climbing on an “active rest day” just outside of Canmore.

The tick list (with the grades we found them in ‘ish);
     Rhamnusia: M8 WI6 160m  (Dave led to the top of the mixed only)
     French Reality: M7++ WI6 145m
     Link up of Hydrophobia WI5+ 160m and The Sorcerer WI5 210m
     Sport climbing in Cougar creek up to 10c
     Nemesis: WI5+ 140m
     Man Yoga: First two real pitches: M7 & M7
     -Final climbing day…I left my boots at the hotel…learned this after the two hour drive to the base of  This House of Sky-WI4 500m in the Ghost…needless to say, we didn’t climb…DANG!

Below are a few pics from the trip;

first 2 pitches of Rhamnusia

M8 3rd pitch
base of French Reality
 2ed pitch of French

traveling in style in the Ghost Wilderness

The Sorcerer

finally above the coulds

a foreshortened Hydrophobia

sport climbing on an ice trip?!?!
back to the headwall for day #3 up there!

1st pitch of Nemesis 

2nd pitch

2nd pitch of Man Yoga

driving home from the Ghost after I forgot my boots…

Read more from: On The Road

Dancing on ice in our Northern Neighbor’s back yard

Another fantastic trip to Canada with Dave Rone for SPRING BREAK 2015!!!!!  We managed some good weather for the climbs we went after, even though we talked about Slipstream before the trip as a goal. The weather window and route conditions for a route of that caliper didn’t materialize for us this trip, but it will always be there for next time. We landed on a late Friday night, departed the 2nd Sunday after for 8 possible climbing days.

We did manage some excellent climbing, one link up of two large ice routes and a bit of rock climbing on an “active rest day” just outside of Canmore.

The tick list (in the grades we found them in ‘ish);
     Rhamnusia: M8 WI6 160m  (Dave led to the top of the Mixed only)
     French Reality: M7++ WI6 145m
     Link up of Hydrophobia WI5+ 160m and The Sorcerer WI5 210m
     Sport climbing in Cougar creek up to 10c
     Nemesis: WI5+ 140m
     Man Yoga: First two real pitches: M7 & M7
     -Final climbing day…I left my boots at the hotel…learned this after the two hr drive to the base of            This House of Sky-WI4 500m in the Ghost…needless to say, we didn’t climb…DANG!

Below are a few cool pics of the trip;

first 2 pitches of Rhamnusia

M8 3rd pitch
base of French Reality
 2ed pitch of French

traveling in style in the Ghost Wilderness

The Sorcerer

finally above the coulds

a foreshortened Hydrophobia

sport climbing on an ice trip?!?!
back to the headwall for day #3 up there!

1st pitch of Nemesis 

2nd pitch

2nd pitch of Man Yoga

driving home from the Ghost after I forgot my boots…

Read more from: On The Road

Osprey Athlete Alison Gannett’s favorite places to ski…or MTB?

P1010261

“My Favorite Places to Ski, Part 2″ was to be the subject of this post.The weather has been so strange this year (I’ll save that rant forlater), that I pondered writing my favorite places to mountain bike instead. Then is started snowing again! So instead I’ll write about where I’ve skied and biked recently. Quite a year it is when you can do both in the same day!

Whistler, BC, Canada has long been a favorite place for me. Big alpine lines, impressive backcountry access, beyond-stellar views, big big big…the list goes on and on.

 

Since I’m a small town girl, I adore staying in Pemberton, BC instead of in the fancy Whistler resort. Only a half hour away, Pemberton’s lush valley is surrounded by animal, veggie and berry farms, with mountains like Mt. Curry rising 8,000 feet above. For food, don’t miss Mile One – burgers with local Pemby Beef that are to die for, especially with toppings like handmade goat cheese.

The Whistler/Blackcomb resort is so massive that finding a local guide is essential to link the goods together. They do offer free guided tours (check the map/grooming report/big boards for info) or just post on Facebook before heading there and find a friend or friend of friend to guide you. Unless you want to spend a lot of time on lifts or looking at vistas, choose either Whistler or Blackcomb to ski for any given day.

The backcountry is vast, and often requires a sled, but I’ve found plenty great stuff via skins as well. The Duffy is one of the local classic places to go tour. This video below is of Alaska, but it reminds me of the alpine terrain in that area:

Click here to view the embedded video.

So while there last week, the skiing was, well, just ok. Temps had gotten so warm the week before, going above freezing in the valley and all the way to the summits way above. BUMMER. Alas, Whistler and Blackcomb are so extensive, that we even had fun cruising all the groomers. I had fun testing my new Meier Skis – a new women’s prototype that we are working on together that will launch next season. Like our new graphic? Its in the photo above. Venturing off piste was sketchy, slide for life conditions to say the least. So we puckered ourselves just a bit anyway – why not?

Since our backcountry plans got stuffed (no snow on the approaches), we turned to mountain biking those areas instead. Why not? Since my plush Juliana was at home in Colorado, I demoed a more appropriate gravity bike 65 degrees of slackness and 6 front and back to ease my fears from Bike Co. Even though I make a living teaching Mountain Bike camps with Osprey Packs, I wanted to push my own riding. So my friend Susan set me up with Pro-Downhiller and MTB Coach Sylvie Allen and Sweet Skills Mountain Bike Coaching. Whoop, whoop! She took my riding to a new level, with a bit of boosted confidence from my plush ride. One line in particular, to the side of the main Cream Puff trail, had me puckered with its slanting fall line but with some help, voila! Thanks Sylvie! Here is a short video of some of the splendor:

Click here to view the embedded video.

Up next this year: KEEN Rippin Chix Mountain Bike Camps with complimentary Osprey Packs hydration pack demos. I’m hoping the new Osprey Zealots will be in the mail this week, so that you can try them in my upcoming MTB skills and singletrack camps in Fruita, followed by Eagle/Vail, Paonia, Crested Butte, and Moab.

Zealot15_S15_Side_AtomicOrange

This hydration pack not only has all my favorite great looks and features (bite valve/hose magnet, rigid reservoir, helmet carrying fixins, special tool compartment/carrying system, etc), but also enables carrying of your more gravity oriented equipment.

Read more from: Blogs,On The Road