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Ames Adventure Outfitters is a Manufacturers' Representative for top quality indoor & outdoor clothing and equipment, water proofing supplies, packs, tents, solar and monitoring devices, trail running, approach, and mountaineering shoes/boots, socks, and other accessories. The manufacturing firms that we represent consistently offer merchandise that leads the industry in new technology and are regularly awarded accordingly. It is our belief that outstanding customer service and integrity in all business transactions are essential for long term success in this industry. Spend some time at the site getting to know us and our product lines.  We look forward to working with you!


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The Best Climbing Gear for Long Trad and Alpine Routes

Last August, SCARPA athlete Shingo Ohkawa spent month in search of first descents on the classic vertical walls of Wyoming’s spectacular Wind River Range. While he and his partners horsepacked in to base camp, it was all human-powered effort from there. Long days on approach and even longer days in a harness and climbing shoes […]

The post The Best Climbing Gear for Long Trad and Alpine Routes appeared first on SCARPA North America.

Read more from: Blogs,On The Road

What I’ve Learned: Dan Beall Talks his Buttermilks Super Project “The Process” (V16)

This winter marked the culmination of my longest project, originally The Grandpa Project, now “The Process” (V16) after a Daniel Woods FA, in the Buttermilks near Bishop, California. Though this season ended regrettably with the destruction of the crux hold rather than a send, I still learned a lot about working a project of this […]

The post What I’ve Learned: Dan Beall Talks his Buttermilks Super Project “The Process” (V16) appeared first on SCARPA North America.

Read more from: Athletes,Blogs,On The Road

Road Trip Week Six: East

Highway 1 runs along the very western edge of the North American continent. We were driving north to south, with the Pacific a constant companion to the west. After only seeing it for the first time when we reached Tofino, it had already started to feel like an old friend. We last left you as we were entering the Big Sur region. That’s where we’ll pick up.

That morning we had said goodbye to two friends who we had studied on exchange with us at Trent University. Their time in North America was coming to an end and it was difficult to see them go. Their departure marked us as the last exchange students from Trent travelling around the United States.

 

McWay Falls resize

McWay Falls: One of countless beautiful stops travelling through Big Sur

We took the driving easy. Big Sur was great at accommodating that. There are limitless opportunities for forays down the steep cliffs to explore the shoreline or equally up the steep slopes away from the ocean to try and find views inland. We passed the famous McWay Falls near to which we came across two unfortunate travellers who had been unlucky enough to lock their keys inside their hire car. We gave them a ride to the nearest town. Steve and Beverley – if you’re reading this, we still all intend to take you up on the offer of a place to stay if we ever visit Boston.

 

Sherman resize

We didn’t even know how to begin trying to photograph this giant. The General Sherman Tree.

Leaving the Big Sur region we reached another milestone in the journey. We turned east. We lost sight of the Pacific and wouldn’t see it again for the rest of the trip. Although east was a homewards direction it didn’t feel like we were nearing the end of things. Our next destination was Sequoia National Forest.

From the offset we’ve had a tendency to arrive late regardless of when we set off in the morning. Sequoia was no different and we drove the last portion of the steep uphill switchbacks in darkness after watching yet another killer sunset.

The next morning we woke up early to have some time with General Sherman alone. General Sherman is the world’s largest tree by volume. A giant sequoia, its massive bulk sets it apart from a grove already full of giants. You cannot see its top from the base, you cannot hear the voice of someone talking loudly at the opposite side of its trunk, and you cannot fail to be amazed by just how absolutely enormous it is.

 

Packing resize

Daily routine: Packing. Unpacking. We’re getting pretty good at it now.

We walked for the rest of the day, from Moro Rock along a trail that lead to the beginning of the High Sierra Trail and from there back through the sequoia groves to somewhere absolutely not where we started, or where we’d left our car. A slight misjudgment on our part. The sun had set and our car was parked about four hours walk away. Feeling a little tired (and perhaps a little lazy) we decided to head back to camp, eat the food we had left and take a free park shuttle bus up in the morning. At camp we ran into a Scottish/Slovenia couple. They advised us that leaving our car out there all night was leaving it at serious risk of bear break in. They very kindly drove us up to where it was parked and we were able to retrieve it that night.

Good deeds come around very quickly on the road, it seems.

 

Pitstop resize

Our first experience of over 35°C/95°F temperatures on the trip.

Our next move is to drive east through Nevada towards Utah. Our air conditioning doesn’t work, and hasn’t ever been able to really do more than feebly blow lukewarm air in our faces. It’s not been a problem before now but with us about to enter Nevada’s deserts, we don’t think we could cope with the daytime temperatures so we’re going to load up on caffeine this evening and drive through the night to hopefully reach somewhere air conditioned or at least cooler than the 40 degrees Celsius (over 100 Fahrenheit) daytime temperatures we’re expecting throughout Nevada. Wish us luck!

 

Sequoia Sunset resize

Sam, wearing his Atmos AG, takes in the sunset from high up a valley in Sequoia National Park.

Sierra Nevada resize

A day’s walk took us out just far enough to get a glimpse of the potential adventures to be had beyond.

 

Road trip. Two months. Five European friends across Canada from Toronto to Vancouver and through the States from San Francisco back to Toronto via as many cool places in between as we can find. We’ve used cities as way-markers but our interest is in the land we’ll travel through between them. Along the way we’ll pass through more National Parks than you can shake a stick at. Camp stoves, beaches, forests, mountains, waterfalls, adventures and waking up in a tent somewhere new every morning.

Keep up with us throughout our journey via the weekly blogs posted here that we’ll be writing for Osprey Packs or follow us on Instagram:

SamLeakey

RobbieTravels

CiaranTragheim

Read more from: Blogs,On The Road

Road Trip Week Six: East

Highway 1 runs along the very western edge of the North American continent. We were driving north to south, with the Pacific a constant companion to the west. After only seeing it for the first time when we reached Tofino, it had already started to feel like an old friend. We last left you as we were entering the Big Sur region. That’s where we’ll pick up.

That morning we had said goodbye to two friends who we had studied on exchange with us at Trent University. Their time in North America was coming to an end and it was difficult to see them go. Their departure marked us as the last exchange students from Trent travelling around the United States.

 

McWay Falls resize

McWay Falls: One of countless beautiful stops travelling through Big Sur

We took the driving easy. Big Sur was great at accommodating that. There are limitless opportunities for forays down the steep cliffs to explore the shoreline or equally up the steep slopes away from the ocean to try and find views inland. We passed the famous McWay Falls near to which we came across two unfortunate travellers who had been unlucky enough to lock their keys inside their hire car. We gave them a ride to the nearest town. Steve and Beverley – if you’re reading this, we still all intend to take you up on the offer of a place to stay if we ever visit Boston.

 

Sherman resize

We didn’t even know how to begin trying to photograph this giant. The General Sherman Tree.

Leaving the Big Sur region we reached another milestone in the journey. We turned east. We lost sight of the Pacific and wouldn’t see it again for the rest of the trip. Although east was a homewards direction it didn’t feel like we were nearing the end of things. Our next destination was Sequoia National Forest.

From the offset we’ve had a tendency to arrive late regardless of when we set off in the morning. Sequoia was no different and we drove the last portion of the steep uphill switchbacks in darkness after watching yet another killer sunset.

The next morning we woke up early to have some time with General Sherman alone. General Sherman is the world’s largest tree by volume. A giant sequoia, its massive bulk sets it apart from a grove already full of giants. You cannot see its top from the base, you cannot hear the voice of someone talking loudly at the opposite side of its trunk, and you cannot fail to be amazed by just how absolutely enormous it is.

 

Packing resize

Daily routine: Packing. Unpacking. We’re getting pretty good at it now.

We walked for the rest of the day, from Moro Rock along a trail that lead to the beginning of the High Sierra Trail and from there back through the sequoia groves to somewhere absolutely not where we started, or where we’d left our car. A slight misjudgment on our part. The sun had set and our car was parked about four hours walk away. Feeling a little tired (and perhaps a little lazy) we decided to head back to camp, eat the food we had left and take a free park shuttle bus up in the morning. At camp we ran into a Scottish/Slovenia couple. They advised us that leaving our car out there all night was leaving it at serious risk of bear break in. They very kindly drove us up to where it was parked and we were able to retrieve it that night.

Good deeds come around very quickly on the road, it seems.

 

Pitstop resize

Our first experience of over 35°C/95°F temperatures on the trip.

Our next move is to drive east through Nevada towards Utah. Our air conditioning doesn’t work, and hasn’t ever been able to really do more than feebly blow lukewarm air in our faces. It’s not been a problem before now but with us about to enter Nevada’s deserts, we don’t think we could cope with the daytime temperatures so we’re going to load up on caffeine this evening and drive through the night to hopefully reach somewhere air conditioned or at least cooler than the 40 degrees Celsius (over 100 Fahrenheit) daytime temperatures we’re expecting throughout Nevada. Wish us luck!

 

Sequoia Sunset resize

Sam, wearing his Atmos AG, takes in the sunset from high up a valley in Sequoia National Park.

Sierra Nevada resize

A day’s walk took us out just far enough to get a glimpse of the potential adventures to be had beyond.

 

Road trip. Two months. Five European friends across Canada from Toronto to Vancouver and through the States from San Francisco back to Toronto via as many cool places in between as we can find. We’ve used cities as way-markers but our interest is in the land we’ll travel through between them. Along the way we’ll pass through more National Parks than you can shake a stick at. Camp stoves, beaches, forests, mountains, waterfalls, adventures and waking up in a tent somewhere new every morning.

Keep up with us throughout our journey via the weekly blogs posted here that we’ll be writing for Osprey Packs or follow us on Instagram:

SamLeakey

RobbieTravels

CiaranTragheim

Read more from: Blogs,On The Road

10 Questions with Osprey Athlete Sven Brunso

10 Questions with Osprey Athlete Sven Brunso

Sven_Brunso_Osprey_Packs_Kode_ABS

 

1. What place inspires you?

The Alps are the place that brings me inspiration. The magnitude of the mountains, nearly limitless access, the ski culture and food make for an unbeatable experience. Every time I visit the Alps I fall in love with skiing all over again.

SvenBrunso_4_3_2015_BioPhoto2

 

2. What one item do you always have in your pack?

Hot Egyptian Licorice Tea in a thermal bottle. Nothing is better than some hot tea in the mountains. Sipping some sweet and spicy tea soaking while up the mountains is a pretty incredible combo.

sven_tea_osprey_packs

3. Who do you most admire?

Early mountaineers that made historic ascents with rudimentary gear. The early mountaineers were extremist as they did amazing things with little fanfare or potential reward.

4. What is your favorite food?

Kaiserschmarrn. An Austrian dessert made with pancakes, rum, raisins, powdered sugar and plum sauce. It’s so good that sometimes I will eat it twice a day while skiing in Austria.

5. Which Osprey pack are you using right now? What is your favorite feature about your pack?

I love the Kode series. On really big days in the backcountry I use the Kode 42 ABS pack. I can take a puffy, extra gloves, a big bottle of tea, all my avalanche gear and my skins. On regular days I will take the Kode 22 as it has plenty of room for everything I need and it feels like I am skiing without a pack. I love that both the Kode 22 and 42 have a great spot to stow my helmet on top of the pack.

Kode42_F13_Side_HoodooRedKode22_F13_Side_NitroGreen

6. Do you have a favorite quote? What is it?

“The Mountains are calling and I must go.” –John Muir

SvenBrunso_4_4_15_Interview5

7. What’s the number one place you’d love to visit next?

Corralco, Chile. I love going to South America to ski and Corralco is one place I am really excited to go this summer. There is something very special about boarding a plane in August when it is 90 degrees out and landing in Chile where it is the middle of winter.

8. What is your favorite nonprofit?

My family volunteers at the Manna Soup Kitchen where I live in Durango, Colorado. I am also a huge fan of the Special Olympics.

9. Is there an adventure, trip, or journey you’ve taken that you’d say was “life changing?” What was it and how did it change your life or outlook?

The first time I went to the Alps in 1992. I went to Chamonix, France and my mind was blown. I knew then and there that I needed to figure out a way to make it in the ski industry so I could come and play in the Alps every winter.

10. If you could give any advice to yourself at 10 years old, what would you say?

Take chances and try to live your dreams. My father, a guidance counselor, told me that if I dreamed of being a pro skier, I should try to make it happen. He didn’t promise I would make it, but he did say I would never regret trying.

 SvenBrunso__Osprey_Packs

About Sven Brunso:

I recognize that I am extremely fortunate to be able to travel the world and ski with the world’s best photographers. I am very driven to try and take full advantage of these incredible opportunities. I am inspired by great ski photography and I am so lucky to be a part of the incredible process.

I am an overgrown kid that refuses to be defined by my age. I have logged more than 2,500 ski days in my career, but I still go to bed excited when I know I am going skiing the next day. I have an incredible family that supports my adventures and provides me with an incredible foundation. I am an example of someone finding a way to make their dreams real.Sven_Brunso_Osprey_Packs

Follow Sven’s adventures on Instagram 

Read more from: Blogs,On The Road